Sleep Tip #1 UNPLUG YOUR BEDROOM

Sleep Tip #1 UNPLUG YOUR BEDROOM

At the end of a long day, it’s tempting to turn on Netflix, scroll through Instagram, or catch up on emails before hitting the pillow, but try to refrain. While this may feel like relaxing or unwinding, the light from your phone or computer screen is sending opposite signals to your brain.

Sleep studies have found that blue light from phone or laptop screens isn’t calming at all; it actually inhibits melatonin production. Melatonin, a hormone produced in the pineal gland, plays a large role in regulating wakefulness, so interfering with your body’s natural system can spell trouble for your sleep. Try picking up a book or jot down notes in a journal before bed instead of jarring yourself awake with harsh sources of light. If you really must finish up work or homework late into the night, keep brightness levels as low as possible.

How to Get More Sleep

How to Get More Sleep

So, you know the importance of getting enough sleep, but how do you get there? It’s not always easy to fall asleep at a regular hour, especially for those people who find their minds wandering as soon as the lights go out. However, finding enough time to sleep is one of the best things you can do for yourself. Instead of throwing your hands up and assuming that there’s no way to turn your poor sleep situation around, keep these tips in mind.

  • Reduce screen time in the hours before bed. Specialists say the blue light associated with electronic devices has the ability to disrupt your circadian rhythm and restrict the production of melatonin, making it harder to fall asleep.
  • Dedicate your bed to sleep. Many people use their beds for activities outside of sleeping, like studying and watching TV. However, if you want your brain to associate bedtime with sleeping time, cut down on outside use.
  • Get comfy. It’s always harder to sleep when you’re not in the right environment. Instead of skimping on bedding, invest in plush pillows, high-quality sheets, and a cozy duvet to make your bed as appealing as possible.
  • Lower the temperature. When your body is getting ready to sleep, your body temperature naturally lowers around one to two degrees. By keeping your bedroom on the cooler side, you can get a jumpstart on this process.
  • Cut out caffeine. Cutting out that post-lunch cup of coffee can feel almost impossible when the mid-afternoon slump kicks in, but try to stick to decaf. Caffeine has a half-life of around five hours, keeping you alert for a long time and potentially interrupting your sleep.
  • Stick to a schedule. Sleeping in on Saturday and Sunday may feel like bliss, but it could be affecting your sleep during the work week. Rather than staying up late on the weekends and enjoying a lie-in til noon, try to create a consistent schedule so that your body is used to your weeknight habits.

Getting plenty of sleep is a critical part of living your best life, affecting everything from your beach bod to your cardiovascular health. If you commit to anything in the New Year, let healthy sleeping habits be the gift that keeps on giving.

Better Sleep Tips from Haven Sleep

Better Sleep Tips from Haven Sleep

We’ve all been there: you hit the pillow, exhausted from a long day, and sleep just doesn’t come. You toss, you turn, you reposition yourself to try to get comfortable, you flip your pillow back and forth in search of the cold side, but it’s all for nothing – the great night’s sleep you crave isn’t happening.

Unfortunately, a poor sleeping experience isn’t anything new. Around one-third of people ages 18 to 64 get less than seven hours of sleep on average. As a whole, the demographic averaged just 7.12 hours, barely breaking into the recommended seven to nine hours. Quality of sleep suffers as well; 43% of men and 55% of women report trouble getting to sleep or staying asleep.

So, what can you do? How can you make sure you’re getting enough sleep, and getting good sleep to boot? From great mattress to a solid bedtime routine, here’s what you need to know about the road to a better night’s sleep.